• Introduksjon til GamingHill.com

    GamingHill.com er et verdensomspennende sosialt spillenettverk som tilbyr avtaler, verktøy, anmeldelser, nyheter og underholdning som er spillrelaterte.
    Les mer her.

Texas Hold'em

Share/Bookmark



Introduction Texas Hold'em:

With all the hype about Texas Holdem Poker today, it's difficult not to know basic Texas Hold em rules and guidelines. This Texas Holdem Poker rule guide will help you learn the basics of how to play Texas Holdem poker using basic rules.


Rules:

There are several rounds of betting in the Texas Holdem Poker rule book. The first round is called the preflop, the second is called the flop, the third is called the turn or fourth street, and the final round is called the river or fifth street. Players have the option to check, call, bet, raise, or fold, depending on the situation set forth.


Dealer:

To begin a new game, the dealer begins by shuffling a 52 card deck and passing one card face up to each player. The player with the highest value card will be chosen to be the "dealer" and will be given a button called the dealer button. The Texas Holdem Poker rule is that if two people have a card of the same value the tie is split by the value of the suit by alphabetical order. The lowest value suit is a club and the highest value suit is a spade.Small and big blinds:

Once the dealer is determined the Texas Holdem Poker game may begin. The person directly to the left of the dealer button must place a forced bet which is called the small blind. The small blind is equal to one half of the lowest bet at the table. In addition to the posting of the small blind, the person directly to the left of the small blind must post the big blind. The big blind is equal to the smallest bet at the table. You are ready to begine when your table has a dealer button, a small blind, and a big blind.


Dealing cards:

The dealer can shuffle the deck several times and begin dealing cards in a clockwise manner, beginning with the small blind and ending at themselves. The dealer is either a dedicated dealer at a casino or the person who has the dealer button in front of them. The Texas Holdem Poker rule book states that each player should receive no more and no less than 2 cards face down and may not show them to other players at the table.Starting hands

In texas Holdem you have 169 possible starting hands.
The best starting hand is:

The worst starting hand is:


Pre flop:

After each player has received their two "hole cards" the first round of betting (preflop) may begin. The first person to act is the person directly to the left of the big blind. This person has the option to fold, call, or raise. If the player just joined a game that had begun before they sat down they have the option to check rather than call, because they should have posted an amount equal to the big blind in order to join the hand.The flop:

After the first round of betting ends, the dealer should "burn" the top card, by placing it aside of the deck, and take the next three cards and lay them face up in the center of the table. From the flop on the player (with cards) to the direct left of the dealer begins the round of betting. They have the option to check (make no bet), or bet. Once this round of betting is completed we move on to the next round, the turn (aka fourth street).


The turn:

To begin the turn (fouth street), the dealer must burn one more card by moving it to the side and then placing on card face up to the right of the other cards at the table. Another round of betting occurs starting again with the player (with cards) to the direct left of the dealer.The river:

The river is the final card. Once again the dealer must burn a card and then lay the last (river) card to the right of the other cards. This begins the final round and players may make their final betting decisions. After the betting ends, players will enter into a showdown.


Showdown:

The showdown is where players display their cards, beginning with the player who made the last bet and moving clockwise from there. The player with the highest poker hand rank wins the pot. In the event of a tie, the pot is split amongst the players who have the equal hand.

Follow this guide and you will be a master of the Texas Holdem Poker Rules.


Introduction Texas Hold'em:



Fixed Limit Texas Hold'em, Set-Up and Play:

In Limit Texas Hold'em the bets are fixed. There are small bets and big bets. The small bets are used in the first two rounds of betting and the big bets used in the third and fourth rounds of betting. The big bets are always double the sum of the small bets. The amount of the bets depends on the size of the game.


Before the cards are dealt


1. One player functions as the dealer (in a casino this person has a plastic marker in front of him). This spot is called the button. The button determines the order in which the players are to act in the hand and rotates clockwise after each hand is played.
2. The first player to the left of the button (the number 1 seat) puts a forced bet on the table, called the small blind, and the second player to the left of the button (the number 2 seat) also places a forced bet on the table, called the big blind. The big blind is always the same size as the small bet, whereas the small blind is usually half the size of the big blind. For example, in a $10/$20 Limit Texas Hold'em game, the small bet is $10 and the big bet is $20. Therefore, the big blind is $10 (the size of the small bet) and the small blind is $5 (half the size of the big blind and the small bet).


The cards are dealt


The cards are dealt clockwise, starting with the player to the left of the button (the small blind) and ending with the player who is acting as dealer (the button). Each player receives two hole cards, which are placed face down on the table. This hand is called the starting hand.


The first round of betting:


1. The action starts with the player sitting to the left of the big blind (the number 3 seat, also known as sitting under the gun). This player has the option of folding (throwing his hole cards in the middle o The action starts with the player sitting to the left of the big blind (the number 3 seat, also known as sitting under the gun). f the table, called the muck), calling (putting the same amount as the big blind on the table) or raising (by placing two small bets in front of him).

2. The action now rotates to the number 4 seat (the player sitting to the left of the number 3 seat), who has the option of folding, calling, raising or re-raising (though only if it has been raised in front of him).
3. The betting continues clockwise until every player that has not folded has contributed equally to the pot.
Example:
It is a $10/$20 Limit Texas Hold'em game and 10 players are seated at the table. The cards are dealt and the first player to act (sitting under the gun) decides to raise. He must then put $20 into the pot (two small bets). The players sitting in seats 4, 5, 6 and 7 opt to fold and throw their cards in the muck. The player in the number 8 seat chooses to re-raise and must therefore contribute $30 into the pot (three small bets). The player sitting in the number 9 seat decides to call and, consequently, must put $30 into the pot (three small bets). The player sitting on the button (the dealer) folds.
The small blind, who already has $5 committed to the pot, calls and, as a result, must contribute an additional $25 to the pot ($30 in total; equal to three small bets). The action moves to the big blind, who opts to re-raise and, as such, has to put $40 into the pot (since he had $10 in the pot at the start of the hand, he has to put in an additional $30 thus making his bet $40 in total; equal to four small bets).
This is called cap the betting, which means that raises are no longer allowed. In each betting round there are only three raises allowed, making it four bets in total. After the cap, the remaining players can either fold or call. The action resumes with the initial raiser who is sitting under the gun.
4. Once the first betting round is finished and all remaining players have contributed equally to the pot, it is time for the flop.


The flop and the second round of betting:

1. The dealer begins by burning the top card of the deck and placing it face down on the table. This is done in order to prevent cheating in case the top card is marked. This card, the burn card, is henceforth excluded from play. The dealer then flips up three cards on the table for everybody to see. These three cards are the flop. This is a defining moment for all remaining players, as only two more cards are left to come. In other words, 5 out of 7 cards have been revealed. The flop contains community cards, which are used together with the two hole cards to create the best possible 5-card poker hand.

2. Since the blinds are only used on the first round of betting, it is now the small blind who acts first (sitting in the number 1 seat). If the small blind folds before the flop, it becomes the big blind's turn to act, and so forth.

3. The first player to act has the option of checking (the action moves clockwise towards the next remaining player) or betting (if the player bets, it must be exactly one small bet). If all players check on the flop, they are all allowed to see the fourth card (the turn) without putting in any additional money.

4. The betting progresses in the same pattern followed in the first round, with a permitted maximum of three raises (four small bets in total).

Example:

It is a $10/$20 Limit Texas Hold'em game and 10 players are sitting around the table. Following the first round of betting, only the players seated in the small blind, the big blind and on the button are left in the hand. The dealer brings in the pot and puts it in the middle of the table, burns the top card (places it face down on the table) and flips open the three community cards (the flop). Given that the betting proceeds clockwise from the button, it is the small blind who is first to act and he decides to check. The big blind bets ($10; equal to one small bet) and the button opts to call (puts in $10). Once again, it is the small blind's turn to act and he can raise (make it $20; referred to as a check-raise), fold (throw his hole cards in the muck) or call (put in $10).

5. Once the second round of betting is finished and all remaining players have equally contributed to the pot, it is time for the turn.


The turn and the third round of betting:

1. The dealer burns the top card of the deck and flips open a fourth community card next to the flop. This card is called the turn.

2. The betting then advances clockwise from the button, as on the flop. The only difference is that now the bets are doubled and are referred to as big bets.

3. Once the third round of betting is finished and all remaining players have given equally to the pot, it is time for the river.


Example:

It is a $10/$20 Limit Texas Hold'em game and 10 players are seated at the table. After the flop, only the players sitting in the big blind and the button stay in the hand. Since the betting progresses clockwise from the button, the big blind must act first. The big blind decides to bet (puts in $20; equal to one big bet), the button chooses to raise (puts in $40; equal to two big bets) and the big blind elects to call (puts in another $20; making two big bets in total). The third round of betting is now complete.


The river and the fourth round of betting:


1. The dealer burns the top card of the deck and flips open a fifth community card next to the flop and the turn. This card is called the river.

2. The betting then moves clockwise from the button, as on the flop and the turn.

3. The bets equal the same amount as those placed on the turn.

4. The hand is over.

5. The dealer moves the button one position clockwise. The deck is reshuffled and dealt again.


Example:

It is a $10/$20 Limit Texas Hold'em game and 10 players are seated around the table. After the turn, only the players sitting in the big blind and the button are left in the hand. Since the betting advances clockwise from the button, it is the big blind who is first to act. The big blind chooses to check and the action continues on to the button, who bets (puts in $20; equal to the size of one big bet). The big blind now has the option of folding, raising or calling and decides to call (puts in $20; equal the size of one big bet). The button has been called and, because this is the last round of betting, he has to flip two hole cards face up on the table. He then combines his hole cards with the five community cards to create the best possible 5-card poker hand. The big blind has the option of throwing his hole cards in the muck (in case he can not beat the button's hand), or of flipping his hole cards face up on the table to show the winning hand. In order to win the pot, both hole cards must be flipped face up, even though only one hole card might be used for making the best hand.


Top 10 starting hands in Texas Hold'em:



Which to Hold, Which to Fold

One of the first and most important things to learn when playing Texas Hold'em is which starting hands are worth staying in with and which you should fold. Deciding whether or not those two down cards you're first dealt are playable is the most important decision in every hand, because while you have to be in it to win it, you also can't lose money you haven't bet.

Since the two hole or pocket cards are the only thing that will make your hand better or worse than any other players, it's important that they are good strong cards.


Top 10 starting hands


This is the best Hold'em poker hand you can hope to have. It's the best of the best, and will win more than any other hand. Also known as American Airlines, pocket rockets, and bullets.


This 2nd-best hold'em hand is still incredibly strong and will win you a good chunk of change. Two kings, or "cowboys" are only dominated by aces.


Two queens, or "ladies" are a very good hand. Sure, kings and aces will beat you, but you've got the upper hand on jacks and below.


Ace-king is a strong but tricky hand. It is the strongest of the drawing hands, but the flop needs to work with you to give you a pair of aces or kings for it to really pay off. Suited it is slightly stronger than unsuited, as then you can also make the nut flush much more easily.


A pair of jacks, ten-handed, will win almost 20% of the time. If the flop shows a queen, king, or ace, watch out, but otherwise, it's smooth sailing.


Ace-queen is the second best drawing hand, and when suited, will win about 20% of the time as well.


King-queen, especially suited, is a great drawing hand that is only afraid of an Ace falling on the board.


Ace-jack is another great drawing hand. Suited is always better here, but unsuited is still playable.


King-jack, especially in later positions, is a fine hand to play, but can be beat by any of the hands listed above and should be folded to big raises. Statistically, suited it will win just under 19% of the time, but unsuited that drops to just 15%.


Ace-ten is still a good hand -- you've got the ace, and can make a straight if the miracle J-Q-K falls on the board. But be wary of playing it too strong, especially unsuited, as if all you end up with is a pair of aces, you may be out-kicked


Top 10 worst starting hands in texas Hold'em:


Sure, you know that a pair of aces are the best hand in Texas Hold'em, but do you know the worst starting hands? Knowing that these hands are almost-always-fold'em hands in hold'em is just as important to improving your poker game and not playing like a donkey.

Some of these "worst hands" are bad in the same way and will lose at about the same rate, so they have been called ties, even when one is a slightly better hand.


Top 10 worst starting hands



7-2 off suit is considered the worst hand in Texas Hold'em. They are the lowest two cards you can have that cannot make a straight (there's 4 cards between 2 and 7). Even if they are suited, they will make you a very low flush, and if either pairs, it's an awfully low hand.

Because it is the worst, some players will play it for fun and in online games, it is known as "the hammer."


This is the same basic problem as above, only you've got an 8 instead of a 7. Still pretty bad for a high card. Suited or not, this is a fold'em hold'em hand.

Tie: &
The 3 makes this hand able to beat the two above it, but with the 3-8 you still can't make a straight and the 3-7 still, well, just sucks.


While if the board gives you a miracle flop of 3-4-5, you will have a straight, someone with a 6-7 will have a higher straight. If you get a flush, someone will probably have a higher flush. Against even 4 players, this hand will lose about 90% of the time. Not good odds.

Tie: & &
The only thing these three hands have going for them over the hands above is the 9. If the 9 pairs, you'll have a middle pair that could still be beat by anyone holding pocket 10s, jacks, queens, kings, or aces, yet you might be fooled by a board filled with low cards into thinking you have the best hand and losing a lot of money. No straights can fill the gap between these cards, either. Beware.


This hand has a legendary quality because Doyle Brunson captured two World Series of Poker Bracelets with it. But it's not a good hand -- Doyle Brunson is one of the all-time best in the game and unless you're a Texas road gambler who's logged thousands of hours at the table, you shouldn't try and win with the Doyle Brunson.


Another hand people play because it's fun is the old 9 to 5, the "Dolly Parton." If you're playing to win, it's not a good idea to play hands because they have a funny name. That may be how you pick the winning horse in a race, but poker's a marathon, not a sprint, and over the long term there's no doubt this hand is a statistical loser.

Tie: & & &
All these hands will rarely win, especially unsuited. Toss 'em. Just toss'em. Yes, even in the little blind. If you see two low cards in the hole, unless you're in the big blind and you can see the flop for free, fold.

Face card + low card, unsuited:
One of the most common mistakes I see beginners make is that when they see any paint in their hand, they play it. J-2, Q-3, K-4 whatever -- and most of these hands are losers. They're junk that may win a few pots, but more often will lose you huge cash when you find the other player has a higher kicker and the winning hand.

Ace + low card, unsuited:
This is another common beginner mistake, playing any ace. Again, it may win occasionally, and heads-up it's a fine hand, but at a table of 4 or more, this hand shouldn't be played if there's a raise in front of you. You're going to be outkicked a lot with Ace-little, and it's going to feel like a kick in the junk when the other player shows their higher ace.